Final Project Solution

$35.00 $30.80

Description

[50/20] 1. Programming Project I (Individual Project)

 

[10/5] (a) Use Java or other programming languages you are familiar to implement the Extended Euclidean algorithm.

 

Input: two large positive random numbers (a; b) of length 1024 bits, i.e., jaj = jbj = 1024

    Output: two numbers (c; d), where c = a 1 mod b is the inverse of a under modulus b, and
    d = b 1 mod a is the inverse of b under modulus a
[10/5] (b) Use Java or other programming languages you are familiar to implement the Miller-Rabin primality
    test
    Input: one large positive random numbers a of length 1024 bits, i.e., jaj = 1024
    Output: output 1 if a is a prime, and 0 otherwise.
[30/10] (c) Use Java or other programming languages you are familiar to implement the demonstrations of
    RSA Encryption/Decryption algorithm, ElGamal Encryption/ Decryption algorithm, and Diffie-
    Hellman key exchange protocol. The functions and user interfaces of demonstrations should be
    designed similarly as the following figures.

 

 

RSA  Encryption/Decryption

 

  1. Generate primes p and q p =

 

  • =

 

  1. Compute n=pq  Com

 

n =

 

  1. Set a public key e e =

 

Calculate the private key d d =

Gen ( 1000 < p, q < 5000 )

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cal

 

5. Input a message m   m =
6. Encrypt c=me mod n Enc c =
7. Decrypt m=cd mod n   m =
Dec

 

 

 

ElGamal Encryption/Decryption

 

  1. Given a large prime p=65537,  a primary root g=3

 

  1. Choose a private key x  x =

 

  1. Compute the corresponding public key y=gxmod p Com

 

  • =

 

  1. Input a message mm =

 

  1. Encrypt
4.1 Choose a random number r   r =
4.2 Compute c1=gr mod p Com c1 =
4.3 Compute c2=m*yr mod p Com c2 =
5. Decrypt C=(c1,c2 )    
  m=c2/(c1) x mod p Dec m =

 

 

 

Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange

 

  1. Given a large prime p=65537,  a primary root g=3

 

  1. Choose a random number x

 

x =

 

  1. Compute X=gxmod p Com

 

X =  3. Choose a random number y

y =

4. Compute  Y=gy mod p Com          
  Y =                      
                       
                         
5. Calculate the session key K=gxy mod p          
  K=Yx mod p=           K=Xy mod p=        
        Cal     Cal

 

 

[15/5] 2. Programming Project II (Individual Project)

 

The following ciphertext C has been generated with the Vigenere Cipher. Please cryptanalyze the ci-phertext and recover the corresponding plaintext M and the used key K. For the cryptanalysis, you only know the length of the used key K is 4. Please use Java or other programming languages you are famil-iar to implement an algorithm, which takes C and other required information as input, and automatically outputs the recovered M and K. In addition to provide the source code, please also write down the detailed strategy you have applied to recover M and K. Note that, the relative frequencies of letters in

 

2

 

 

text are shown in the following figure.

 

 

OOFWGTXYE – FKVY MHIULX WTOGLE TH AMBELFS MV XAIAAPL, KQSDAAPL, ZQROLD AGK YUVO YOKL – FONJT NXHDLR LHEKF MSILOT HM PABSK LBMQ IG AADT-F’E MHKQRG DAREK. FEVOZOEVSY BZ BOPLDEW UAT CBET UF EIEPOOG JTIIZ MN-W LXEVADIVPFY, UBF BR ATE VYQAMPHIMF MNW PZGXUGIMF AF VVYPNAQR LJUE-GAUSMZ IHH ADAGZXAML EOVPQTR’Z ZEXKE AGK IAGAE IGAA PKVPUVAE TAHF CTU UMIYAVX IATA ZACBLFY TUP TAL QCHUAMR.

 

 

    The relative frequencies of letters   The most frequent diagrams in English on a relative scale of 1 to 10:
                      Diagram Frequency   Diagram   Frequency
  a   8.2% j   0.2 s   6.3      
          TH 10.00   HE   9.05
                         
  b   1.5 k   0.8 t   9.1    
          IN 7.17   ER   6.65
                         
  c   2.8 l   4.0 u   2.8   RE 5.92   ON   5.70
  d   4.3 m   2.4 v   1.0   AN 5.63   EN   4.76
                      AT 4.72   ES   4.24
  e   12.7 n   6.7 w   2.4    
          ED 4.12   TE   4.04
                         
  f   2.2 o   7.5 x   0.2    
          TI 4.00   OR   3.98
                         
  g   2.0 p   1.9 y   2.0   ST 3.81   AR   3.54
                      ND 3.52   TO   3.50
  h   6.1 q   0.1 z   0.1    
          NT 3.44   IS   3.43
                         
  i   7.0 r   6.0          
              OF 3.38   IT   3.26
                         
                      AL 3.15   AS   3.00
                           
                  The most frequent trigrams in English:      
      ENT   ION   AND ING   IVE TIO FOR OUR THI ONE
                                 

 

 

[35/5] 3. Design Project (Individual Project)

 

Alice has a set of files F = fF1; F2; ; Fn g, each file is around 100 M. Because files are huge in size, Alice plans to store them in a cloud. Later, when Alice wants to retrieve one of them, she just needs to launch a query and the cloud server will return the desired one. However, since the cloud server is not fully trusted, we usually consider it as semi-trusted, i.e., honest-but-curious model. Under this trust model, please help Alice design a scheme for secure file storing and retrieval in cloud server, and the following requirements should be met:

 

Even though files F = fF1; F2; ; Fng are stored in the cloud, the cloud server cannot read the content of each file.

 

Even though the cloud server also has one file Fc, which is exactly the same as one file in the set F = fF1; F2;   ; Fng stored in the cloud, the cloud server cannot identify the file in the set F.

 

When Alice launches a query on some file Fi, if Fi really exists in the cloud, the cloud server can return the result with O(log n) processing time or less.

 

Please write down your design as much detail as possible. You do not necessarily implement your design with some programming language, but extensive security analysis and performance evaluation should be provided.

 

 

[0/70] 4. Final Project – CS6355 (Group-based Project)

 

Write a survey of no more than 3000 words (not including references) on your selected topic. Your sur-vey must contain the following section headings: (1) abstract, (2) introduction, (3) detailed description of the topic, (4) related work in this area, (5) your thoughts and remarks on how to use the algorithms and protocols in the class to achieve some security requirements in your selected topic, and (6) references (additional sections are not allowed).

 

Note that the survey can be based on papers published within the last six years including: various IEEE/ACM Journals, Magazines, and security related conferences. Your survey must contain at least 6 references to papers of the above mentioned journals, magazines and conferences. You are not allowed to use the Wikipedia as a source.

 

Form disjoint groups: each consisting of 4-5 students. Notify the instructor of the group members’ information via email (rlu1@unb.ca) by October 01, 2019 before class. Those students who are not in any group by October 01, 2019 will be arranged into groups to the instructor’s discretion.

 

Available topics: you can select a topic from the list of available topics appended at the end of this document, or you may propose your own project to the instructor no later than October 01, 2019. Your proposed project is subject to the instructor’s approval. Note that any given project can only be taken by one group; projects will be awarded on a first-come first-serve basis, being judged by the “Sent” time of the emails.

 

Peer Review: Each group’s survey will be reviewed by each of the other groups (see schedule below). Prepare a one-page review report per group for each survey you review, and submit the review report ac-cording to the schedule below. Your review reports must include comments organized into the following two sections: (1) scientific/practical merit: correctness, accuracy, significance, and non-triviality, and

  • presentation: clarity, organization, and English usage. Additional sections are not allowed. Improve your survey based on the comments you receive from other groups and resubmit according to the sched-ule below. Your review reports are worth 15 of your final project. Your review reports will be evaluated according to their diligence.

 

Present your project: in the week of November 25, 2019 and afterwards (schedule of presentations will be generated randomly). Your presentation must last no more than 30 minutes. The use of supporting material such as slides, whiteboard, handouts, software tools, etc., is encouraged. Your presentation is worth 5 of your final project, and will be evaluated according to their soundness, clarity, precision, and conciseness. Note that, excellent presentations will gain additional 5 bonus points in your final project based on the instructor’s discretion.

 

Grade of final project in this course: Your final project is worth 28% (=40%*0.7) of your final grade for this course, including 20% for your final survey report, 6% for your review reports, and 2% for your presentation. Note that, additional 2% bonus from your excellent presentation may be exercised.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A list of available topics:

 

  • Trust Management in Pervasive Computing

 

Evolution of trust management, pervasive computing, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in Bluetooth Enabled Devices

 

Evolution of Bluetooth, security requirements and challenges for Bluetooth Enabled devices, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Smart Card Security

 

Evolution of Smart card, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security Assessment on Google Android

 

Evolution of Google Android, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Smart Grid Security

 

Evolution of smart grid, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Addressing the Insider Threat

 

Evolution of insider threat, security challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Privacy-Aware Role-Based Access Control

 

Evolution of Privacy-Aware Role-Based Access Control, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • RFID Technology Security

 

Evolution of RFID Technology, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in eHealthcare System

 

Evolution of eHealthcare system, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

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  • Security and Privacy in Online Social Network

 

Evolution of online social network, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in Electronic Voting

 

Evolution of Electronic Voting system, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in Wireless Sensor Networks

 

Evolution of wireless sensor network, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks

 

Evolution of Vehicular Ad Hoc Network, security requirements and challenges, possible so-lution for at least one challenge

 

  • Security in Wireless Mesh Networks

 

Evolution of Wireless Mesh Networks, security requirements and challenges, possible solution for at least one challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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